Saturday, September 5, 2020

John Robie of Haverhill 1648-1691 and Ann Corliss












John, the last of my Robie line, was born in Hampton, New Hampshire in 1648, son of Henry Robie and Ruth Moore. John settled just over the Massachusetts line in a town called Haverhill. John married Anne Corliss, daughter of George Corliss on 1 November 1677. Little is known about the couple and their daily lives, but we do know that they ended in tragedy.

children: all recorded in Haverhill

Ruth: b. 14 October 1678 m. 10 Dec 1701, d. 19 April 1753 Hampton, NH
Icabod: b. 15 Jan 1679 
Henry: b. 12 Mar 1680/1 d. 17 Mar 1680/1
Johanna: b. 5 Mar 1681/2
Sarah: b. 6 Mar 1683/4
Deliverance: b. 17 Feb 1685
John 25 Mar 1688

From the Haverhill records we know that John Robie built a house there between 1675 and 1677. He had been a soldier during the 1675 King Philip's War, a brutal bloody fight between the Native Americans and the English colonist. The English narrowly defeated the Natives who all but pushed them into the ocean. 

Once married, John's family rapidly expanded. Ann gave birth every year or two. They lost their infant son Henry in March of 1680. In 1679 John requested additional land from the town and in 1680 he was granted 5 or 6 acres more. He also purchased meadow land from a neighbor Thomas Davis.

Despite winning King Philip's war, the colonies were not at peace with the Native Americans. With French Canadian allies raiding parties swept across the land with lightening quick strikes. 1690 saw the beginning of what is known as King William's War. New Hampshire suffered multiple attacks including the 1689 attack on Cocheco Falls, 1690 attack on Salmon Falls, the 1691 massacre at Brackett Lane, near Sandy Beach. Massachusetts was not spared from these attacks. My ancestor Phillip Rowell was killed in July 1690 in Amesbury. In 1694 the residents of Oyster River were wiped out, including my ancestors John and Remembrance Rand.

In the midst of these tense times, Anne Corliss Robie died on 1 June 1691, leaving six children, the eldest was thirteen the youngest three. Word reached John of a threat of impending danger of attack. he packed up his children and took them to a 'house of refuge', possibly a garrison house, for protection. Leaving them, he was returning to his house with his eldest son Icabod when he was killed by a musket ball. His son was taken captive by the attackers, but he later escaped. 

John's estate and his children were given over to his brother Thomas Robie. An inventory was taken of his possessions which valued about £309.00. It included all the accouterments typical of a farm life including cows, pigs, horses and oxen.

Many ancestor, his daughter Ruth Robie, was taken to Hampton, where she later married and raised her family. 

In my upcoming novel, The Heron, I explore the experience of living under the constant threat of attack and include many of my own ancestors and minor characters, bringing their world to life. Look for it April 2021. See The Book's Delight for details. 

Readers please note that I cannot reply to comments. Feel free to contact me using the form at the top left. 


Sunday, August 23, 2020

Henry Robie of Castle Donington and Hampton, New Hampshire



English Origins

Henry Robie is believed to the son of Thomas and Mary Coxon Robie of Castle Donington, Leicestershire, England. If so, he was baptized on 12 February 1618. His family ancestry can be reliable traced for several generations and the family name is found in local records for centuries. 

Coming to America

The ship and date of sailing are unknown, but Henry's name is found in the Dorchester records by 1639. He didn't stay long in Massachusetts and by 1640 he was in Exeter, New Hampshire and later by 1650, he removed to Hampton, where he spent the remainder of his life. Like all upstanding citizens, Henry performed his civic duties, he acted as constable for the year 1661 and was chosen to be a selectman in 1656. He served as a justice of the peace for many years as well as that of judge of the court of sessions. 

Exeter was known as a lumber town and while there, Henry joined in the building of a sawmill. Later in life he was an innkeeper. 

Family

Henry married three times. [1] Ruth Moore who died 5 May 1673
                                            [2] Elizabeth (Philbrick)(Chase) Garland who died 11 Feb 1677
                                            [3] Sarah (Unknown) who died 23 Jan 1703 

Children: Mary, b. abt. 1644, m. 1663, Samuel Folsom, named in fathers will
                Thomas b. 1 March 1645/6, d. 1689 Falmouth
                 John b. 2 Feb 1648 my ancestor
                 Judith had an illegitimate child, named in fathers will
                 Ruth b. 3 March 1654, named in father's will
                 Deliverance b. 22 March 1657, m. Nathaniel Haseltine, not in father's will
                 Samuel b. 4 August 1659
                 Icabod b. 26 November 1664
                 Sarah b. 19 April 1679, not named in father's will

Life in Exeter and Hampton

Much of what we know about Henry Roby comes from the records of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County of which Exeter and Hampton were a part. I'm not sure when I last saw a name mentioned quite so many times as our Henry. Beginning in 1643 his name is found year in year out. He took the oath of fidelity in 1648. The following year he was made Clerk of the Market, and in 1650 he was a sworn commissioner for Exeter. 

Henry was sued by his neighbor and sued them in return. He once sued the very contentious Edward Colcord for suing him too much. Henry was also in court representing clients as their attorney. He was the town attorney for Hampton for several years. 

Henry seems to have been something of a hot head and was admonished in court in 1664 for reproaching the minister in reviling speeches concerning the ordinance of baptism. At the time there was huge dissent over the act of baptism, which caused hard feelings on both sides. Henry's wife, Elizabeth was ordered to be sent to jail in Boston for her 'contemptuous carriages' in court. She apologized and avoid prison. 

In 1647 in Exeter, Henry was fined for 'drawing wine and beer without a license'. In 1670 in Hampton he was granted a license, which was renew for many years. The court ruled he could keep an Ordinary but was bound not to let the town's children and servants 'lie tippling in his house'. This order was reinforced in 1679 when the court reminded him that the Ordinary was for travelers only, no townfolk could be served. Henry apparently like to serve himself. He was excommunicated from the church of Hampton by Rev. Moody for being a common drunkard. 

Henry's daughter Judith found her way into the court records when she had a child out of wedlock. The court ordered John Young, the father, to pay maintenance for the child. Apparently the couple never married and the Robys were often in court seeking payment. 

Henry died in 1688. The Reverend Cotton said of him, 'he would not have so honorable a burial as an ass'. This seems to be the case and it is said that 'when dead, his body was taken and thrown in a hole near the great rock in the rear of the old meeting house sometime in the night'. This was to avoid his creditors putting a lien on the body. 

Henry left a lengthy will and codicil. The inventory was extensive and include a 'looking glass that was bought in England'. He was evidently a successful businessman, despite his drinking. 


Sources: 


Sunday, August 16, 2020

Ancestry of Henry Robie of Castle Donington and Hampton, New Hampshire

 



Henry Roby/Robie was an English immigrant who came to New England by the year 1639 making him part of the Great Puritan Migration. It is said that he was the Henry Roby baptized in Castle Donington, Leicestershire on 12 February 1618, the son of Thomas and Mary (Coxen) Robie. His ancestry has been traced back to the 15th century. The name Robie can be found in local records as far back as the 13th century, but there is not enough to trace his lineage that far. 

*John b. about 1455 d. about 1515, wife unknown

        *Thomas b. about 1500, m. Elizabeth Swaine abt. 1530, bur. 5 December 1552

            *Thomas b. 12 April 1536, styled a yeoman, m. 25 Nov. 1569 Joanne Cowley, d/o George Cowley (she d. 10 Oct. 1579), m. (2) 20 Feb 1582/3 Mary Gatley, he d. 12 Sep. 1588

                *Thomas b. 20 April 1576, m. 29 Nov 1606 Mary Coxen b. 20 April 1586 she d. 26 April             1641,  he died 27 March 1653.


Castle Donington is a small market town in the midlands. It was awarded it's market by King Edward I in the 13th century. The parish church is St. Edward King and Marytr, this ancient structure was begun in the 12th century and added to over the years. 




**Photos from Geograph.org 
The house is called the Key Roby house and was built by a Thomas Roby in 1636.

Monday, August 10, 2020

George Corliss: Immigrant to New England

 


english origins
George Corliss is said to hail from Devonshire. There is no proof to confirm his origins, his parents are unknown. He is supposed to have been born about 1617. His arrival in New England cannot be pinpointed. 

haverhill
George is first recorded in Massachusetts in 1639 in the town of Newbury. He gave his age as 22. On 26 October 1645, George Corliss married Joanna Davis, daughter of Thomas and Christian Bellshire Davis of Haverhill. They settled in the West Parish of Haverhill on a farm called Poplar Lawn. He was also made a freeman of the colony in 1645.

Like all men of good standing he did his civic duties. George served as constable in 1650 and as Selectman in 1653, 1657, 1669 and 1679. 

children

Mary 1646, married William Neff
John 1648
Joanna 1650, married Joseph Hutchins
Martha 1652, married Samuel Ladd
Deborah 1655, married Thomas Eastman, Thomas Kingsbury
Ann born 8 November 1657, married John Robie
Huldah 1661, married Samuel Kingsbury
Sarah 1663, married Joseph Ayer

rip
George died in Haverhill on 19 Oct 1686. Joanna died 17 April 1688. George left a substantial estate, and bequeathed land of some sort to most of his children. 

Sunday, August 9, 2020

Thomas Davis and Christian Bellshire; Immigrants to New England



English Origins
Thomas Davis is believed on strong circumstantial evidence to be the son of John and Agnes Unknown Davis of Acton Turville, Gloucestershire a parish of Chipping Sodbury. Agnes was not Agnes Chandler. This was a different couple. Thomas and Agnes had the following children, known from his will. Samuel, Thomas, James, and a daughter Sarah. James had two sons, James and John, also named. At the time of its writing, John Davis was married to a Sarah Reede. The date of death of Agnes is unknown. 


Summary of the will of John Davis:
- my son Samuel...
- my son Thomas...
- James and John Davis, sons of my son James...
- Sarah, daughter of my son James...
- Sarah my now wife...
- remainder of estate to son James who is to be excecutor.

Abstract of will of JOHN DAVIS, Acton Turville, 1626:
In the name of God Amen, I, John Davis of Acton Turville in the countye of Glouc., yeoma', sycke in bodye but of good and p'fect memory, do make thys my laste will and Testament in manner and form following. My bodye to be buryed in ye Churchyarde of Acton Turville aforesaide. It' I gyve unto my sonne Samyll in regard of one cowe whych . . . Item I gyve unto my sonne Thomas twelve pence. Item I guve unto . . . sonne twelve pence. Item I geve unto James Davys and John Davis my sonne James his sonness...shillings a peece. I gyve unto Sara my sonne James his daugher (ten shillings?). Item I gyve unto Sara my nowe wyfe on coffer. ffurther my will is that I...which I gyve unto my Sonn Samyll in regard of his...him bymy executor when he have served his apprentis...not then to remayne to my sonne James his children. It'l al the est of my goods moveable and unmoveable andye executorsyeare of my lease...my sonne James Davys whome I make my executor of this my last will and testament. Also I do Intreate and Apoynt will p'formed...Apryll 1626.
The marke of John x Davis. Wytness to this will John Sloper"

James Davis of Haverhill, Massachusetts in a known son of John Davis of Acton Turville. This seems to cement the relationship between Thomas and the Davis' of Acton Turville. 

marriage
Thomas is believed to have been born about 1603 and married Christian Bellshire in Chipping Sodbury, Gloucestershire, England on 14 November 1622. This would put Thomas at age nineteen, a bit on the young side for marriage but it seems to check out. 

children
Joanna b. about 1625, married Oct. 1645 George Corliss, 4 Oct. 1687 James Ordway
Joseph b. about 1627, d. 15 Nov. 1671, unmarried and childless.
Mary bp. 29 March 1629 Chipping Sodbury, nothing further

coming to new england
Thomas Davies, Sawyer, of Marlborough, sailed on the James in 1635 out of Southampton. He had two children; Joanna and Joseph. He first settled in Newbury before removing to Haverhill where he was known to be by 1641 where he became a freeman on 2 June. He was not only a sawyer but also a mason, and was known as a yeoman. Although he owned books, he made his mark on various documents. 

Like most men of the time, Thomas performed his civic duties, serving on juries, both petit and grand, commission to end small causes and once served as constable. He would have served with thl local militia until he was dismissed in 1662. This was usual for men when they reached about age 60 or so. 

He owned and sold various properties and in 1661 he deeded land to his son Joseph adjoining his in Haverhill. When he died on 27 July 1683, the majority of the value of his estate was in property.

rip
Christian died in Haverhill on 7 April 1668. Thomas lived a good long life and died at about age 80 on 27 July 1683.


Sources:

Chase, George Wingate, 1826-1867. The History of Haverhill, Massachusetts: From Its First Settlement In 1640 to the Year 1860. Haverhill [Mass.]: Published by the author, 1861.

Great Migration 1634-1635, C-F. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2008.) Originally published as: The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume II, C-F, by Robert Charles Anderson, George F. Sanborn, Jr., and Melinde Lutz Sanborn. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2001.

https://www.americanancestors.org/DB115/i/7373/315/22175288

Thursday, August 6, 2020

Henry Ambrose of Salisbury Massachusetts b. 1649 d. 1724



Here is the fourth Henry Ambrose of his line. He was born probably in Salisbury where his father was known to have lived at the time. His father moved about in his later years, living in Hampton, Charlestown, Salisbury, and Boston where he died. His son, Henry was only ten at the time of his father's death. His mother, Susanna, remarried in 1663 and lived with her husband, John Serverence in Salisbury.

Henry spent his entire life in Salisbury. He worked as a weaver. In 1672 he married Susanna Unknown Worcester, widow of Timothy. Surprisingly, they had only three children, one of which died as an infant or small child. Not much else is known about this couple. He took the oath of fidelity in 1677 and they both became full members of their church in 1715. Susanna died on 22 December 1730, a widow, Henry's death is unknown, but according to an article in the Essex Antiquarian, he died before 1724.

Their first child, Dorothy married Samuel Colby in 1693.

Sources:

[1] Hoyt, David Webster, 1833-1921. The Old Families of Salisbury And Amesbury, Massachusetts: With Some Related Families of Newbury, Haverhill, Ipswich And Hampton. Providence, R.I.: [Snow & Farnham, printers], 18971917.

[2] The Essex Antiquarian. Salem, MA: The Essex Antiquarian, 13 vols. 1897-1909. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2006.)

https://www.americanancestors.org/DB96/i/7532/74/6834329

Photo by Johannes Plenio

Friday, July 31, 2020

Henry Ambrose of Kersey, Suffolk; Immigrant to New England





English Origins
According to a 1992 article in the New Hampshire Genealogical Record. Henry Ambrose, immigrant to New England hailed from Kersey, Suffolk. Kersey is a scant 10 or so miles from Groton, home of John Winthrop, Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Coincidence? I think not, and it's interesting to note, than another ancestor, John Gage, is likely the boy baptized in Kersey in 1605.

Kersey is a sleepy little village, once famous for its Kersey woollen cloth. Today, its famous for the houses that Henry Ambrose saw on a daily basis. 

Henry was born in 1613, baptized in the ancient church of St Marys.


New England
It is not known when he sailed for America but he was recorded in Hampton, New Hampshire in 1640. A carpenter by trade, Henry went where there was business. At some point, either before or after sailing, he married a woman named Susanna. In 1647 Henry sold his house and house lot to the Reverend Wheelwright, but it is believed he purchased another home as he remained in Hampton until 1649.

In 1650 Henry is recorded as living in Salisbury. In 1654 he was in Boston. 1656 Charlestown and finally back to Boston, where he died in 1658. 

Henry served on the Gran Jury as well as the Jury of Trial at various Quarterly Courts.

Family
Henry and Susanna had a relatively small family with large gaps between some of the children. Were there miscarriages in between?  

Ebenezer b. about 1640 probably in Hampton
Samuel bapt. 25 July 1641 Hampton
Henry b. June 1649
Abigail bp. 28 Dec 1654

Henry died in Boston. His inventory reveals his home to be typical of the time. Two stories with two rooms on each floor, plus a cellar. In the Great Chamber was found a long table with six stools and three chairs, a chest and sideboard and a second small table. The Great Lower Room was filled with a bed, a trundle bed, a table, kettle, cupboard with books and pewter. The Kitchen  had yet another table and chairs plus all the accouterments you'd need to prepare food. The rooms upstairs appear to have been used for storage. All in all his estate was valued at 337£.

Susanna
Susanna remained a widow for several years after Henry's death. She married in Salisbury on 2 October 1663 to John Severence. His wife, Abigail, died in 1658, same year as Henry, giving birth to her eleventh child. John ran several ordinarys (taverns) and was likely in need of a wife and mother for his children. He died in 1682, leaving Susanna a widow for the second time. She was still alive in 1692.

My Ancestry
I am descended from his son Henry who also married a woman, a widow, named Susanna.

John Robie of Haverhill 1648-1691 and Ann Corliss

John, the last of my Robie line, was born in Hampton, New Hampshire in 1648, son of Henry Robie and Ruth Moore. John settled just over the ...