Thursday, November 12, 2020

Richard Ingram (1600-1683) England to Northampton, MA Internet Errors




This one in a series of internet errors I've come across in relation to Great Migration Immigrants to New England. 

The origins of Richard Ingram of Northampton, Massachusetts are unknown. 

He is not the son of Arthur Ingram and Jane Mallory or Arthur Ingram and Lady Eleanor Slingsby.

Richard was born about 1600, probably in England. He married twice. His first wife was Elizabeth___ and his second the widow Jane Rockwell Baker. He first is found in Salem (Marblehead) then made moves to Reheboth before ending up in Northampton in Hampshire County. Elizabeth is not Elizabeth Wignall as shown by Robert Charles Anderson of the Great Migration Project, nor was he married in Barrowby in 1628. 

See his wikitree page for more information.

This is from Ingram researcher Larry Chesebro (do check out his webpage for further info):

Richard's ancestry simply is unknown and all claims to his Royal ancestry cannot be accepted! He's NOT the son of Jane Mallory and Arthur Ingram, esq. Neither is he the son of Jane Mallory, daughter of Sir William Mallory and wife of Thomas Lascelles.

I, as many others, have tried to link Richard to Sir Arthur Ingram, II born ca 1598 and Eleanor Slingsby through Sir Arthur Ingram, I and Jane Mallory, and even directly, but cannot! My research has found Ingram, Mallory and Slingsby records eliminating their families as ancestors of Richard. I have maintained our information for the rich Slingsby and Mallory history and because both families have other links to the Chesebro' family. And, there is always the possibility that Sir Arthur's father, Sir Arthur, II, or grandfather, Hugh, could be related in some other way than directly to Richard.

My extensive and documented data is online at http://chesebro.net where you can search for Hugh Ingram in the Family Files and then view tree information for the Ingram/Ingraham descendants and their Slingsby and Mallory connections with their tree information.

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Photo by Johannes Plenio - Just because it's beautiful

Tuesday, November 10, 2020

Captain Nicholas Simpkins of London, England and Boston, Massachusetts (1600-1654) Internet Errors




This is a short blurb, which will be one of many about errors I've come across while checking on the Puritan Great Migration feed for Wikitree. The subject is Captain Nicholas Simpkins. According to his featured bio in RCA's Great Migration series, Nicholas arrived in Boston by 1635. He was from London, where he married Isabel Saule. Isabel's father was a tailor as was Nicholas. It is possible that he was an apprentice, but that is not proven. 

On the internet, Nicholas is said to be from Burcote, Northamptonshire, son of Nicholas Simpkins and Katherine Ann Harris. Katherine is said to have been from Gloucestershire. 

None of these claims are accompanied by sources. A red flag is the distance between Burcote and Gloucestershire. 

Nicholas and Isabel had four children, three daughters and one son. Efam was baptised at St. Gabriel in London, the church were her parents were married. She is not mentioned further. Other children were daughters Deborah and Rebecca and son Pilgrim. 


Sources:

Great Migration 1634-1635, R-S. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org. New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2012.) Originally published as: The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volume VI, R-S, by Robert Charles Anderson. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2009.

https://www.americanancestors.org/DB397/i/12124/333/23901413


Monday, November 9, 2020

William Pillsbury and his wife Dorothy Crosby of Dorchester and Newbury

 














English Origins

William Pillsbury, name spelled variously, is possibly from Leek, Staffordshire. Two genealogies published in the late 19th/ early 20th centuries on the family offered two wills, one for a Thomas Pillsbury of Leek who died in 1622 and a William of Heaton whose will was probated in 1640. Both of these men had sons named William that were born about 1605. Heaton and Leek are only 5 miles apart and it's possible that the two were related. One nod in William's favor is that he was a husbandman and Thomas a blacksmith. As William the immigrant was also a husbandman seems to fit more closely. 

That being said, neither Mary Lovering Holman, noted genealogist of the Pillsbury Family, nor Robert Charles Anderson, confirm any ancestry for William. There is nothing, other than the rarity of the name, to tie William to either man. 

William's possible mother, is dependent on the father. If William Pilsbury of Heaton was the father then  his mother was Agnes (Stodderd) Pilsbury. If Thomas Pilsburie of Leek was the father his mother was Elizabeth (Unknown) Pilsburie. If the father of this profile is neither William Pilsberie of Heaton nor Thomas Pilsburie of Leek, then his mother is unknown.

William's age is based on a 1676 deposition in which he said he was about 71 years old. 


Coming to America


William's name is first found in the records of New England when he and Dorothy Crosby appeared before the Quarterly Court in Boston on 1 June 1641. Both were bound for their good behavior. He was
'enjoined to work with Goodman Wisswell two days of the week and Goodman one day in the week for five years. Their bond was set at £10.00.

They next appeared in court on 29 July 1641, this time a married couple. He was censured to be whipped for defiling his masters house as was she. Clearly, both William and Dorothy were indentured servants, in separate houses, and have gotten themselves into a romantic relationship. Their marriage was not recorded, so where exactly they were living is unknown. Their daughter, Dorothy, was born in Dorchester, so it is possible that that is where they resided at the time. 

Children

Deborah, b. April 16, 1642 in Dorchester, m. _______ Ewens

Job, b. October 16, 1643 in Dorchester, m. April 5, 1677 Katherine Gavett in Newbury d. September 10, 1716 in Newbury

Moses, b. about 1645, m. March 1668 Susanna Worth, d. before November 3, 1701 (probate of will)

Abel, b. 1652 in Newbury, m. about 1675 Mary _______, d. before 1697

Caleb, b. January 28, 1653/4 in Newbury, never married, d. July 4, 1680 in Newbury

William, b. July 27, 1656 in Newbury, m. December 13, 1677 Mary Kenny, d. October 28, 1734 in Salisbury. 

Experience, b. April 10, 1658 in Newbury, d. August 4, 1708 in Newbury

Increase, b. October 10, 1660 in Newbury, d. 1690 (drowned off Cape Breton, N.S. in Sir William Phips' expedition)

Thankful, b. April 22, 1662 in Newbury, living and unmarried in 1686


Life in Massachusetts

It is not know for who or for how long William was indentured, but he seems to have been a free man when next he is mentioned in the Dorchester town records in 1648. In 1651 William purchased the home lot of Edward Rawson of Newbury. From 1653 onward, William's name appears in the Newbury records where he bought and sold land. He was a yeoman/husbandman or planter. In otherwords, he was a farmer.

William became a freeman of the Massachusetts Colony in 1668.

William Pillsbury of Newbury wrote his will on 22 April 1686. He named in his will, wife Dorothy, children: Job, Moses, Abel, William, Increase, married daughter Deborah Ewens, Experience and Thankful. William died on 19 June 1686 and buried the next day. His death was noted by diarist Samuel Sewall. 

Sabbath-day Morn. Goodman Pilsbury was buried just after the ringing of the second Bell. Grave dugg over night. Mr. Richardson Preached from I Cor. 3, 21.22, going something out of 's Order by reason of the occasion, and singling out those Words Or Death.

The inventory of William's estate was taken on July 7, 1686 by his son Job and was appraised at over £317, including £190 in land, £45 in livestock, and £12 for a man servant.

His will was probated on September 10, 1686.

Dorothy Crosby was born about 1622 in England. Nothing is known about her ancestry. Her death, after that of her husband, was not recorded. 

My ancestor is their son William who married Mary Kinne, daughter of Henry and Ann Kinne.

Richard Ingram (1600-1683) England to Northampton, MA Internet Errors

This one in a series of internet errors I've come across in relation to Great Migration Immigrants to New England.  The origins of Richa...